WordPress takes its stand

I am trying out different content management systems as a way of displaying thoughts and comments. Unfortunately my web host only allows 5 MySQL databases and each content management system wants its own database. I also require some MySQL use for experimenting and developing my own code. The upshot is that I need to delete unwanted systems to make room for others. It is not a great hassle to cut content out of 1 and save it for use with another but if the database is first dropped then that data is gone, gone, gone.

How this looks on TextPat

How this looks on TextPat

Now we have a WordPress box of tricks, installed through the most useful Softaculous aspect of CPanel from my web host provider. I have kept the old ZOCo pages in their raw HTML. I tidied them up with CSS and cleaned up a little of the code some time ago but will not be making any further changes. These articles still get enough hits to make it worthwhile keeping them. I have set up Moodle as a site to host files from education. These are largely word documents. I have had bad experiences with Moodle, slow, slow, slow. So far this installation has gone OK, new files have just whipped up in exactly the way that they never used to. This is probably because there are no classes to track, anyone can access as guest and grab the goodies. So no massive log in or group handling overhead. Also no submissions or grade tracking, no forums or news. It could be argued that having ignored this vast chunk of Moodle there is no great reason for having it at all. What I have used the system for could be handled by an FTP server just as well except for the rather smart grouping and display of files. Moodle is doing a fine job of this, the only drawback is that a lot of web server space is being taken up by the Moodle system files, this is not the same as the data files that the users can access, it just the webspace required for the system to work at all.
I did have TextPattern as a content management system, having seen a web developer’s page that made good use of it. The installation worked, I could add content and the default banner colour was an ‘oh so pretty’ yellow gradient. I could also make minor changes to layout and style without too much fiddling.
I have moved it to the back burner for the following reasons. I cannot easily edit the raw html within it, I post in clear text and can change the view to html. It is clear that the full html tag system is not being used here and more importantly I could not edit that HTML. An early blow was that an article could not have more than 1 image without some clever jiggery-pokery plug-in magic.
TextPattern uses CSS which is OK but also has its own set of tags for marking up sections of pages. I could learn this but it will only work on that system. I looked through the TextPattern official pages searching for tutorials and documentation and gave the subject a swift google. There were surprisingly few articles and several dated back to the mid 2000s. This gives the impression that TextPattern is no longer at the cutting edge of development, so I moved on to the next in line.

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