Early WordPress thoughts

On the good side this WordPress engine is a lot easier to get along with than TextPattern. There are menus of things to do along the side and top of the page with those that make most sense at the top and right. As you go down the list dangerous categories such as Plugins and Tools show their face; thankfully the system will work without having to use these.

WordPress Menu

WordPress Menu

Images such as the above are forced to a width of 300 pixels and the appropriate scaled height. The automated ‘add media’ selection will place the file on the page and create the code to show the image together with a hypertext link to the full size image. Luckily this is all in html so can be customised on the page. The novice page builder should note that the full size image will be stored and loaded on clicking the small image shown on the page. There is no thumbnail, the image is simply crunched down in physical size. There are 2 issues to contend with here. If the image has a large storage size (as images tend to do) the page will still be loading this hefty file and can take its time doing that. Another issue is that large files could fill up the user’s capacity on the server. I have been uploading small file size images so far so have not worried about creating custom thumbnails. It would not be hard to modify the code, create your own thumbnail and use that instead of one of the picture urls. The creation of pure html is a positive aspect of this engine.
One drawback of using WordPress is its use of new tabs to show content. When I preview this page, it opens in a new tab of the browser. Adding new media places the content on this page. If the editing page is not first saved the content will be lost as new media is added. The browser should show a warning when this happens. Simple tweaking of this site resulted in several new tabs being created. The spares can be closed down but overenthusiastic closing of tabs will lose access to this site. I have set up the preferences in 1 browser to automatically reopen the pages as a logged in administration user. This shows a good deal of information that the regular user ought not to see. I am checking the pages in another browser to get feedback on what a regular user ought to be seeing.

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